CAMPAIGNS

DIRECT CARE & RESCUE

parrot

Surrendering Your Parrot


FacebookTwitterPinterestShare

If you have made the difficult decision to surrender your parrot, we urge you to please read the following information before you take the next step:

If you are feeling frustrated and regret that you brought a parrot into your life, you are not alone. Each year millions of parrot guardians are led to believe that parrots make wonderful pets, only to later discover that parrots don’t make good pets for most people.

You may believe that your only option is to surrender your parrot, for both you and your bird’s best interests. However, it’s estimated that most people who surrender their parrots are unaware of the potential and perhaps even simple solutions to modify their parrot’s behavior or change a problematic situation. And unfortunately, it’s not uncommon for some people to surrender one “problematic” parrot and replace him with another parrot, thinking that the next bird will be better behaved and less noisy, only to find themselves back in the same situation.

Parrots are highly intelligent, sensitive creatures. In many instances, a parrot’s problematic behavior isn’t his problem but rather the result of his environment and how he’s being handled. By consulting with a legitimate avian behaviorist and by reading qualified educational material, you can potentially learn better behavior management skills to modify your bird’s “bad” behaviors. Attending bird clubs and having a “bird support group,” where you can listen to and share stories, may be all that’s needed to reignite the love you have for your feathered companion.
Here are just a few behavioral problems, dynamics, or environmental issues that can be potentially corrected:

  • Screaming
  • Chewing
  • Biting
  • Plucking
  • Difficult cage cleaning
  • Aggression
  • One person syndrome
  • Lack of available time

Each time a parrot is surrendered, bought, or sold, an existing homeless bird will potentially lose his opportunity for a loving, permanent home. Even if you find a home for your unwanted parrot, you’ve taken away another parrot’s chance for a home and his future security. Due to the escalating rise in homeless, unwanted “pet” birds, we strongly encourage caring and responsible parrot guardians to try the alternative direction listed above before surrendering their parrots.

We realize that some parrot guardians may be experiencing circumstances that are out of their control and they don’t have the ability to consider these other options. Or that keeping a parrot may not be in the bird’s best interest: it could even be detrimental or dangerous for a bird to stay in his present environment. In such cases, we support and encourage a surrender decision.

If this is your situation, the following websites offer How-To Surrender information so you can create your own application form and screen your bird’s potential new guardian thoroughly and more easily. Some websites provide downloadable application forms.

If you would like to adopt a bird, these sites also offer information on bird adoption.

http://www.avianwelfare.org/needhelp/placing.htm

http://www.mickaboo.org/adopt.html

http://www.fosterparrots.com/applic.html

http://www.petfinder.com