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Victory for Carroll County Dogs!

September 17th, 2009 by Doll Stanley

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Applon being seized from the property in Carroll County.

Applon being seized from the property in Carroll County.

On Monday, Doll was back in a Carroll County courtroom fighting to win the freedom of 12 dogs kept in squalid conditions. This was Doll’s third trip to court for this case and the judge finally awarded Doll custody of all 12 dogs. Project Hope seized the dogs back in August with the help of the Carroll County Sheriff’s Department and the dogs have been convalescing at the Sanctuary ever since. They are all doing well, despite all having been infected with numerous parasites and being way under-weight. Once healthy these dogs will be sent to Every Creature Counts in Denver to start a new life in a loving home.

Emma, still afraid, but resting comfortably at Project Hope.

Emma, still afraid, but resting comfortably at Project Hope.


from the press release on this case:

Carroll County Court awards In Defense of Animals (IDA) custody of seized dogs

Carroll County, Miss. – On September 15, In Defense of Animals (IDA) was awarded custody of 12 severely neglected dogs. Carroll County Justice Court Judge Jimmy Avant ruled against a claim that the Carroll County Sheriff’s Department and IDA had gone beyond the scope of their seizure order when confiscating the dogs. The court ruled the dogs were lawfully seized.

The investigation was prompted by three complaints concerning the condition of the dogs. On June 26, IDA’s Project Hope sanctuary in Carroll County received two of the calls. Doll Stanley, IDA’s Director of Investigations and the Project Hope sanctuary, responded.

“I saw emaciated dogs chained without proper shelter, their water blackened with filth, debris, and mosquito larvae. A few had dried bread and slop in their pans, two had molded slop in theirs. A hound was confined in a travel dog box for beagles and terriers. She could not sit or stand and the box was laden with filth. Another dog was confined in a feces-laden cage infested with maggots. The dogs had sores, matted eyes, and most suffered skin disorders,” reported Stanley.

Initially, Judge Avant gave a warning and time to the “owner” of the dogs to correct their conditions. IDA’s Project Hope and veterinarians sent letters urging immediate action. On August 6, the judge asked Deputy Brad Carver to see if conditions for the dogs had improved. They hadn’t, so a seizure order was issued, and IDA, acting as agent for the CCSO, removed the dogs on August 7. The seizure took place on Carroll County Road 129.

According to IDA’s Stanley, “When we returned the 7th to remove the dogs, some had been loosed and others had been moved. We enticed and trapped the loose dogs with food. Then, learning the other dogs were moved beyond the residence we went for them. Two were chained in the midst of debris – one was the dog who’d been held in the transport box. The others were confined in what could only be described as pig wallow. Water, feces, and earth had combined to create a horrid confinement of black muck. Two of the rescuers became ill from the stench.”

The “owner” of the dog failed to seek a hearing for their custody, and his son petitioned that the dogs were wrongly taken from the adjoining property. Judge Avant found no credence to the property issue.